High Fiber Diet

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High Fiber Diet

The high-fiber diet provides bulk in the diet and helps keep bowels regular

This diet can be used in relieving symptoms, in the prevention or treatment of diverticular disease, hemorrhoids, constipation, cancer of the colon, Crohn's disease, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and irritable bowel syndrome.

Studies have shown that a balanced diet containing different kinds of fiber can help regulate the bowels, aid in the prevention of heart disease and protect against a number of other health problems.

Another way fiber contributes to good health is by helping to protect against cancer of the colon and rectum. Foods that contain fiber also tend to contain other cancer fighting nutrients, such as vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium.

Dietary Guidelines

  • Scan food labels for bread and cereal products listing whole grain or whole wheat as the first ingredient.

  • Look for cooked and ready to eat cereals with at least 3 grams of fiber per serving.

  • Eat raw fruits and vegetables; they have more fiber than cooked or canned foods, or juice. Dried fruits (especially dried figs) are also good sources of fiber.

  • Increase fiber in meat dishes by adding pinto beans, kidney beans, black-eyed peas, bran, or oatmeal.

  • Try adding 2-3 tsp. of unprocessed wheat bran to foods such as meatloaf, casseroles, homemade breads, muffins and other baked goods.

  • Dairy foods provide little fiber. Increase fiber by adding fresh fruit, whole grain or bran cereals, nuts, or seeds to yogurt or cottage cheese.

  • Chopping, peeling, cooking, pureeing, and processing may reduce fiber content

  • Substitute oat bran for one third of all purpose flour in baked goods recipes.

  • Best to eat a variety of foods and not to rely on a fiber supplement

  • Do it gradually - rapid fiber increase may result in gas, cramping, bloating, or diarrhea.

  • Drink plenty of fluids - at least 8 cups every day.

BREADS & GRAINS 6-11 servings each day

  • Whole grain breads, muffins, bagels, or pita bread

  • Rye bread

  • Whole wheat crackers or crisp breads

  • Whole grain or bran cereals

  • Oatmeal, oat bran, or grits

  • Barley, dry

  • Wheat germ

  • Whole wheat pasta

  • Brown rice

VEGETABLES 3-5 servings each day

All vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, green beans, green pepper, onions, peas, potatoes with skin, snow peas, spinach, squash, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, zucchini

FRUIT 2-4 servings each day

All fruits such as apple, banana, berries, grapefruit, nectarine, orange, peach, pear

MILK & DAIRY 2-3 servings each day

All

MEAT & MEAT SUBSTITUTES 2-3 servings or total of 6 oz daily

  • All beans and peas such as garbanzo beans, kidney beans, lentils, lima beans, split peas, and pinto beans

  • All nuts and seeds such as almonds, peanuts, Brazil nuts, cashews, peanut butter, walnuts, sesame and sunflower seeds

  • All meat, poultry, fish, and eggs

If you are following a low fat diet, use nuts and seeds only in moderation.

FATS & SNACKS

  • Popcorn, whole-wheat pretzels, baked tortilla corn chips or trail mix made with dried fruits, nuts, and seeds

  • Cakes, breads, and cookies made with oatmeal, fruit, and nuts

  • Bean dip

The Top Twenty Fiber Foods - This list can serve as a general guide.

  1. Dried beans, peas, and other legumes - This includes baked beans, kidney beans, split peas, dried limas, garbanzos, pinto beans and black beans.

  2.  Bran cereals - Topping this list are Bran Buds and All-Bran, but 100% Bran, Raisin Bran, Most and Cracklin' Bran are also excellent sources.

  3. Fresh or frozen lima beans, both Fordhook and baby limas

  4. Fresh or frozen green peas

  5. Dried fruit, topped by figs, apricots and dates

  6. Raspberries, blackberries and strawberries

  7. Sweet corn, whether on the cob or cut off in kernels

  8. Whole-wheat and other whole-grain cereal products - Rye, oats, buckwheat and stone-ground cornmeal are all high in fiber. Bread, pastas, pizzas, pancakes and muffins made with whole-grain flours.

  9. Broccoli-very high in fiber!

  10.  Baked potato with the skin - (The skin when crisp is the best part for fiber.) Mashed and boiled potatoes are good, too-but not french fries, which contain a high percentage of fat.

  11. Green snap beans, pole beans, and broad beans - (These are packaged frozen as Italian beans, in Europe they are known as haricot or french beans.)

  12. Plums, pears, and apples - The skin is edible, and are all high in pectin.

  13. Raisins and prunes - Not as high on the list as other dried fruits (see #5) but very valuable.

  14. Greens - Including spinach, beet greens, kale, collards, swiss chard and turnip greens.

  15. Nuts - Especially almonds, Brazil nuts, peanuts, and walnuts (Consume these sparingly, because of their high fat content.).

  16. Cherries

  17. Bananas

  18. Carrots

  19. Coconut - (dried or fresh-but both are high in fat content).

  20. Brussels sprouts

HIGH FIBER DIET FOR DIVERTICULAR DISEASE

To provide a diet with 20 to 35 grams of appropriate fiber to promote regular elimination and increases fecal excretion.

This diet can be used for the management of diverticulosis. The rationale for the increased fiber is that the increased bulk in the stool reduces the pressure in the colon, thus preventing further diverticula from forming.

Diverticulosis (the condition) and diverticulitis (the inflammation) are also called diverticular disease (notice the difference in endings, itis vs osis). Diverticula (the underlying cause of diverticula is constipation: the pressure of straining produces pouches in the colon) are tiny pea-shaped pouches of weakness in the wall of the large intestine. This condition is called diverticulosis and is usually symptom-free. Most people do not realize they have it. However, for a few people, diverticulosis results in spasms and pain.

If the diverticuli become inflamed, infected or ruptured, the condition is called diverticulitis. In other words, a person with diverticulosis may get diverticulitis when waste matter is trapped in a pouch and then becomes inflamed or infected. Diverticulitis can result in fever, pain and tenderness around the left side of the lower abdomen and may require surgery.

The two major signs of diverticular disease are bleeding and infection.

THE HIGH FIBER DIET

Studies have shown that a balanced diet containing different kinds of fiber can help regulate the bowels, aid in the prevention of heart disease and protect against a number of other health problems such as diverticulosis. Another way fiber contributes to good health is by helping to protect against cancer of the colon and rectum. Foods that contain fiber also tend to contain other cancer fighting nutrients, such as vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium.

Dietary Guidelines

  • Many people have the misconception they must avoid tiny seeds, grains, lettuce, and other high fiber containing foods for fear that the particles could lodge in the diverticula and cause inflammation. This has never been proven and in fact microscopic review of surgical specimens show this to not be the case. There is no reason to avoid such foods for fear they will precipitate disaster.

  • Foods such as nuts, popcorn hulls, and sunflower, pumpkin, caraway, and sesame seeds should be avoided.

  • People differ in the amounts and types of foods they can eat. Decisions about diet should be made based on what works best for each person.

  • Scan food labels for bread and cereal products listing whole grain or whole wheat as the first ingredient.

  • Look for cooked and ready to eat cereals with at least 3 grams of fiber per serving.

  • Eat raw fruits and vegetables; they have more fiber than cooked or canned foods, or juice. Dried fruits (especially dried figs) are also good sources of fiber.

  • Increase fiber in meat dishes by adding pinto beans, kidney beans, black-eyed peas, bran, or oatmeal.

  • Try adding 2-3 tsp. of unprocessed wheat bran to foods such as meatloaf, casseroles, homemade breads, muffins and other baked goods.

  • Dairy foods provide little fiber. Increase fiber by adding fresh fruit, whole grain or bran cereals to yogurt or cottage cheese.

  • Chopping, peeling, cooking, pureeing, and processing may reduce fiber content

  • Substitute oat bran for one third of all-purpose flour in baked goods recipes.

  • Best to eat a variety of foods and not to rely on a fiber supplement

  • Do it gradually rapid fiber increase may result in gas, cramping, bloating, or diarrhea.

  • Drink plenty of fluids - A high-fiber diet requires lots of liquids. Fiber acts as a sponge in your large intestine - if you don't drink enough, you could become constipated. Try for at least 6 cups daily.

HIGH FIBER DIET - Suggestion

BREADS & GRAINS 6-11 servings each day

  • Bread, pastas, pizzas, pancakes, muffins, bagels, pita bread and muffins made with whole-grain flours

  • Whole-wheat and other whole-grain cereal products

  • Buckwheat and stone-ground cornmeal

  • Rye bread

  • Whole wheat crackers or crisp breads

  • Whole grain or bran cereals (Excellent high fiber choices are Bran Buds and All-Bran, but 100% Bran, Raisin Bran, Most and Cracklin' Bran are also excellent sources)

  • Oatmeal, oat bran, or grits

  • Barley, dry

  • Wheat germ

  • Whole wheat pasta

  • Brown rice

VEGETABLES 3-5 servings each day

All vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, Greens such as beet greens, kale, collards, Swiss chard and turnip greens, green beans, green pepper, onions, peas, potatoes with skin, Romaine, snow peas, green snap beans, pole beans, broad beans, spinach, squash, sweet potatoes, turnips

The seeds in tomatoes, zucchini, cucumbers, as well as poppy seeds, are generally considered harmless

FRUIT 2-4 servings each day

All fruits such as apple, apricot, banana, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, dates, fig, grapefruit, nectarine, orange, peach, pear, pineapple, prune

The seeds in strawberries and raspberries are generally considered harmless

MILK & DAIRY 2-3 servings each day

All

MEAT & MEAT SUBSTITUTES 2-3 servings or total of 6 oz daily

  • All beans and peas such as azuki, garbanzo beans, black beans, baked beans, kidney beans, fava, lentils, lima beans, split peas, and pinto beans

  • Smooth peanut butter and other smooth nut butters

  • All meat, poultry, fish, and eggs

The seeds in poppy seeds are generally considered harmless

FATS & SNACKS

  • Whole-wheat pretzels, baked tortilla corn chips or trail mix made with dried fruits

  • Cakes, breads, and cookies made with oatmeal or fruit

  • Bean dip


The above opinionated views and information serves to educated and informed consumer .  The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. .It should not replaced professional advise and consultation.  A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions 

Bland Diet
Calorie Controlled Diet
Diabetes Diet
Diet for Cancer
Diet for Constipation
Diet for Dietary Fiber
Eating Well Diet
Elderly Diet
Healthy Diet
High Protein/Calories Diet
High Fiber Diet
Low Fat, Salt, Sugar Diet
Low Fat Diet
Low Fiber Diet
Low Salt Diet
Low Sugar Low Fat Diet
Ostomy Diet
Peptic Ulcer Diet
Stomach Sugery Diet
Vegetatian Diet

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All Right Reserved Last modified:Wednesday, 11 April 2007 12:51:04 PM +0800